Biomass Heating


Biomass thermal energy is the use of biomass for space and domestic water heating, process heat, and the thermal portion of combined heat and power.

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5 Ways the Biomass Heating Industry is Laying the Foundation for Explosive Growth

At HeatSpring, we connect and build communities of learners and experts. Sharing knowledge is our passion. We collaborate with people in technical, complex industries to develop awareness, inspire creative ingenuity, and push boundaries. Most recently, we’ve focused on the biomass energy heating industry.
To get a pulse for what’s happening in the industry, we connected with […]

July 22nd, 2014|Categories: Biomass, Hydronic Heating, Teaching||

Designing Wood Gasification Boiler Protection Systems: T & ∆T Pumping: An application that leverage both strategies

This is a guest article from John Siegenthaler. In the fall, John is teaching an advanced design course on Hydronic-Based Biomass Heating Systems. This is the most advanced and technically challenging biomass design course that you’ll find anywhere. The capstone project for the class will be designing a system and getting it reviewed by John. […]

John Siegenthaler, Biomass Thermal Energy Council, and HeatSpring Launch Hydronic-Based Biomass Design Course

Hydronics expert John Siegenthaler, the Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC), and the online technical training experts at HeatSpring have teamed up to launch a 10-week online course: Hydronic-Based Biomass Design.
The course starts on September 15th. The course is capped at 50 students but we provide 30 discounted seats for those that sign up early. Click […]

May 12th, 2014|Categories: Biomass, Hydronic Heating, Uncategorized||

5+ Trends that will Drive the Growth of the Hydronic Industry in the Next 3 Years: A 30-Minute Conversion with John Siegenthaler

There are a variety of forces changing the dynamics of the hydronic heating and renewable thermal industries that were not happening five years ago. While hydronic distribution is still attractive for similar technical reasons that it was five years ago—comfort, air quality, etc.— there are a host of new trends that can have the ability […]

5 Tips on Designing Vertical or Slinky Geothermal Loop Fields

We’ve found it useful to focus on both articles that will help companies with their sales and marketing AND design and installation. A few weeks ago, I shared a piece – thanks to Ryan Carda – on geothermal flow path analysis for ground loop design that came from a discussion forum from our advanced geothermal design course.  My plan is to share more technical discussions that are happening within the course. If you are installing or designing geothermal projects, these articles will be useful to you if you never take the training. This is my goal.

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Here are a few tips on on vertical and slinky bore design.

Vertical Bore Design

1)      The target (optimum) flow rate versus pipe size is:

2.8 – 3.2 gpm per loop for ¾” loops
4 – 6 gpm per loop for 1” loops
5 – 9 gpm per loop for 1.25” loops

Staying within those flow ranges per loop will keep you well below the maximum recommended flow rate for head loss (4 ft per 100’ of pipe length, Figure 5.4) and above the minimum flow rate required for turbulent flow.  For the vertically-bored design, I recommend using two loops for 6 gpm per loop with 1.25” pipe.

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